Undergraduate Classes Spring 2020

FOUNDATIONS

  • Audio Foundation Studio
  • Visual Foundation Studio
  • Creative Coding
  • Ideation & Prototyping
  • Intro to Web Development
  • Still and Moving Images
  • Interactive Narrative
  • Professional Practices for Creatives
  • Senior Project

ELECTIVES

  • User Experience Design (UX)
  • Sound Design for Media
  • 3D Modeling
  • 3D Animation
  • Intro to Game Development
  • Motion Graphics Studio
  • Contemporary Techniques in Digital Photography and Imaging
  • Media in Game Design and Development
  • Dynamic Web Applications
  • Experimental Cinema
  • Blinking, Beeping, Moving, Sensing
  • Climate and Design Collaborative Studio
  • Construction of Truth
  • Data Visualization
  • Motion Capture
  • Superhero Storytelling: From Comics to Modern Media

Graduate Classes Spring 2020

FOUNDATIONS

  • Thesis – Ahmed Ansari, Scott Fitzgerald, and Benedetta Paiantella
    This course is the capstone of the MS program in Integrated Digital Media. Each student, guided by a thesis adviser and with the other faculty support as required by the specific project, completes a major media-production project. The thesis form and format are determined by agreement between the student and adviser with department approval.
  • Theories and Cultural Impact of Media & Technology – Kavita Kulkarni
    In this course, students will examine and analyze the history and theoretical discourse of media and technology, while connecting these studies to contemporary trends and issues. Students will also explore the cultural impact of media and technology. Lectures, discussions, readings, research, and writing constitute the body of this course.

ELECTIVES

  • Live Performance Studio – Deborah Johnson and Josh Goldberg
    This course introduces students to contemporary digital-performance techniques and issues, i.e., integrating computing technology into traditional performing arts. Drawing on contemporary research in performance studies, as well as technical advances in performing-arts production design, students perform research on how digital technology and media are integrated into dance, theater, performance art and concert-music performance. Students develop performance technologies as part of their research and present them to the group at the end of the semester.
  • Micro-environment Exploration Lab – Elizabeth Henaff
    In this class we will cover a basic understanding of the state of current research in environmental microbiomes. Students will get hands-on experience in which they will learn the computational methods to analyze genomic data. We will design physical devices to interact with this invisible component of our environment, either in form of sampling instruments, bioreactors or bio receptive substrates that propose new symbiotic relationships with the microbial environment.
  • Looking Forward – Regine Gilbert and Gus Chalkias
    This course surveys assistive technologies for people with low vision and blindness, from historical, contemporary, and forward thinking perspectives. Guest lectures from leaders in the field and people with lived experience will help students learn about low-vision and blindness accessibility across several domains (web, wayfinding, literacy, socialization, etc.). In the second half of the class, students will partner with each other and clients/community members to develop their own projects that transform and advance these technologies.
  • Remixing Reality: Social Dreaming in MR – Carla Gannis
    Mixed Reality (MR) refers to a hybrid system that facilitates the mashup of virtual and physical elements along a gradient, from a primarily grounded reality experience to a substantially virtual one. This course is designed to engage students critically in “remixing reality for change”. Taking a speculative design approach, students will address pressing societal issues through thoughtful and imaginative implementations of MR technologies. There will be lectures; class visits from designers, artists, writers and tech ethicists; and hands-on introductions to current and emerging MR platforms. There are no prerequisites for this course, however key assets to success include an inquisitive mind and a regard for our collective future.
  •  Advanced Creative Coding – Kathleen Sullivan
    This course is a graduate-level, intermediate/advanced creative programming course, appropriate for students who have taken Creative Coding (DMGY-6063), or who have demonstrated prior experience in Java/Processing, C++/OpenFrameworks/Cinder, Javascript/p5.js, or Python. Students will learn to apply their existing knowledge in programming to special topics in the art & computational design worlds such as computer vision, audio, hardware control, and networked communication. We will be working with OpenFrameworks, an open source C++ toolkit for creative coding.
  • Physical Product Design & Development – Evan Abel
    In this course students will learn how to bring product ideas into physical reality. We’ll delve into the bottom-up product development process: ideation, design, engineering, and validation. Each phase will require identifying objectives, testing assumptions, understanding stakeholders, and considering tradeoffs between schedule, cost and quality. The course will explore various design communication and fabrication methods including: sketches, renderings, cardboard, foam, clay, 3d printing, CNC, laser cutting, vacuum casting, sheet metal bending, casting, injection molding, blow molding, compression molding, sewing, etc. We will discuss color, material and finish selection (CMF). The course will cover all phases of product development, with a focus on pre-production phases.
  • Makerspace Unlimited – Mark Skwarek
    This class will leverage the tools of the NYU MakerSpace to move a product from the screen to reality. Students will familiarize themselves with the MakerSpace, learning when and why to use the different options available to them. Students will learn to make and format virtual objects in the best way for fabrication. We will discuss not only “what” can be made but more importantly the “why?” it should be made. The ethics of 3D printing, CAD and CNC designs will be considered. This hands-on course will help students realize their ideas as physical objects.
  • Social Research and Design– Mona Sloane
    Design is everywhere. It is no longer is about beautification and style, but about how we organize society: through designed processes, policies, products, technologies, interfaces and so on. As there is growing awareness that design plays as much a role in sustaining oppressive social systems as it plays in critiquing, overthrowing or reforming them, it becomes clear that design and designers need to be more aware of the social worlds they intervene in. This course will address this issue. It will give students a clear sense of the link between design and society and roles that social research can play in designing in a more inclusive and equitable way. It will help students develop social research skills as an integral part of the process of doing design. This will not only highlight different skills and creative approaches that are needed to understand social contexts, but also reflexive and critical ways of intervening into social spaces through design, bringing out clearly the social assumptions that designers employ so that they can be questioned and developed. The course will focus on real problem cases and real world applications that will be worked on. As part of that, it will feature a wide range of design scholars, design practitioners and speakers from industry to help students learn about how design research methodologies can be worked into the context of their projects.
  • Technology and Social Change  – Beth Noveck
    The Governance Innovation Clinic is a public policy and design clinic that supports the strengthening of democratic institutions by using legal and technological innovations to transform and improve how we govern. In this clinic, students work with public institutions on designing solutions to complex public problems. The goals of the clinic are three-fold: to help institutions innovate and become more effective using both big data and collective intelligence; to promote the public’s right to participate in governing in ways that access people’s talents, creativity, and interests; and to empower students to become 21st century public leaders and problem solvers armed with a diverse and powerful toolkit for social change.
  • Technology, Media, and Democracy – Justin Hendricks
    This course represents a New York City-wide effort to create new tech that supports and defends journalism and media — the most critical elements of our democracy — as they are increasingly threatened by political and market forces. The course brings together journalism, design, media studies, and technical disciplines to understand the various threats to journalism and media, and attempt to address these challenges using technical and computational methods and techniques. The free press, journalism and the media are some of the most critical elements of our democracy, but have been increasingly under attack by political and market forces. These challenges include: dwindling resources and support for deep investigative journalism; smear, law and technical and even physical assaults of media organizations and journalists; challenges to credibility and reliability including fake news and discrediting campaigns; and shifting business models and income sources that threaten both local and national news organizations and coverage.
  • Living With Robots – Kathleen McDermott
    The goal of this course is to critically explore the intimate relationships humans form with hardware, particularly electronics that rest in the home and on the body. In this course, we will consider the history of human relationships with robotic and mechanical objects, looking to realms such as mythology, sci-fi, fashion, fine art, industrial design, and medicine. We will also explore various techniques for creating electronic and mechanical objects, using both analog and electronic tools. Ideally, students will gain a broad understanding of domestic hardware design, and find an aspect of the field that resonates with their own creative practice which they will explore further in the final project.
  • Programming is the Art of the Possible – Sam Tarkajian
    What does it mean to be compatible? A given piece of software might not be compatible with a particular operating system. However, with enough effort, almost any system can be made to work with any other. Businesses, institutions, people, and even works of art increasingly offer themselves for automated consumption. People describe themselves by filling out forms on social media profiles. Domino’s Pizza can be ordered using a command line API. Art and an audience may meet in person, or their encounter might be mediated by a screen, or they may never meet at all, instead simply exchanging packets of information. Adobe Illustrator is a drawing application with a scripting language. By taking advantage of this language, we can challenge the stated purpose of the software and invent new uses. GarageBand could send MIDI notes through an interpretation layer to Illustrator, turning musical events into graphic gestures. In this class, we’ll examine tools and techniques for coordinating interaction between and among disparate pieces of hardware and software. We’ll learn different protocols for communication, like HTTP and OSC. We’ll see how to deploy web services, and how to use those services to power networked art. Throughout the course, we’ll put a strong emphasis on group work, and on social strategies for building complex systems as a small team.
  • Access and Assistance Technology in Historical Sites and Museums – Amy Hurst and Anita Perr
    This multidisciplinary course allows students from a variety of backgrounds to work together to learn about and develop assistive technology for historical sites and museums. Students will work in teams to develop prototypes for individuals with diverse motor, cognitive, sensory, and behavior-emotional abilities.
  • Interactions to Services to Systems – Ahmed Ansari
    In the current century, as the distinctions between nature, culture, and the artificial become increasingly blurry, we can no longer talk about design outside of its role in determining the shape and form of human life at different scales, from microinteractions with devices, to massive social systems, models of aspects of the world that can guide intentional change. This course intends to introduce students to general principles, frameworks, and methods in designing at different scales, drawing from a range of different approaches from the fields of interaction, service, and systems design. As a result, students will have a better sense of how to design for stakeholders at various scales, develop appropriate interventions in the form of products and artifacts, services and experiences, and platforms and strategies, and be in a better position to evaluate the consequences of their designed interventions.
  • User Experience Design (ONLINE) – Regine Gilbert
    This is a course on user experience design following the user – centered design process. The course is oriented toward practical methods for approaching a design problem holistically, beyond usability and usefulness. In this class, you will develop an appreciation for the notion of user experience including how to design for it and how to evaluate it. The course will focus on storytelling, sketching, and communication of design ideas within a design team and to potential users. Assignments will focus on hands-on learning through individual assignments, application of design skills in group mini-projects, and peer critique. Creative professionals will be invited as class critics and guest speakers. This course will prepare you to present in a variety of professional environments.
  • Emerging Technology in Storytelling – Todd Bryant and Bradford Young
    This class will discuss the key issues, challenges, and best practices in visual storytelling in Cinema and emerging media like Virtual Reality; the role of emerging technology in storytelling; and issues of equity and access across fields. The class will review select works in Cinema and Virtual Reality and analyze the roles of the cinematographer and virtual reality developer in creating a visual language to see where they converge and diverge. Co-taught by an Academy Award-nominated cinematographer, this class will culminate in a group VR project exploring live motion capture and virtual production that will adapt a pre-existing cinematic work with the class themes in mind. Strong experience with the Unreal Engine is recommended.