Undergraduate Classes Spring 2021

FOUNDATIONS

  • Audio Foundation Studio
  • Visual Foundation Studio
  • Creative Coding
  • Ideation & Prototyping
  • Intro to Web Development
  • Still and Moving Images
  • Interactive Narrative
  • Professional Practices for Creatives
  • Senior Project

ELECTIVES

  • User Experience Design (UX)
  • Sound Design for Media
  • 3D Modeling
  • 3D Animation
  • Intro to Game Development
  • Motion Graphics Studio
  • How the Computer Became Personal
  • Advanced Creative Coding
  • Designing Interactive Experiences
  • Natural Aesthetics
  • Real-Time A/V
  • New Lenses: Experimental Capture & Release
  • Contemporary Techniques in Digital Photography and Imaging
  • Media in Game Design and Development
  • Dynamic Web Applications
  • Experimental Cinema

Graduate Classes Spring 2021

FOUNDATIONS

  • Pre-Thesis & Thesis
    This course is the capstone of the MS program in Integrated Digital Media. Each student, guided with thesis  faculty completes a major media-production project. The thesis form and format are determined by agreement between the student and adviser with department approval.
  • Media Law
    This advanced seminar explores in depth the theoretical and practical aspects of media-communications principles and regulations. Knowledge of media law is crucial for professionals. A full range of models will be explored, from Open Source public license to Digital Rights Management, as well as working definitions of Fair Use and the practical limits of sampling/mixing in different idioms and economic sectors.
  • Theories and Cultural Impact of Media & Technology
    In this course, students will examine and analyze the history and theoretical discourse of media and technology, while connecting these studies to contemporary trends and issues. Students will also explore the cultural impact of media and technology. Lectures, discussions, readings, research, and writing constitute the body of this course.
  • Ideation & Prototyping
    The creative process will be investigated in order to generate ideas for art, design, technology, and business endeavors. The course will show how ideation, design research & thinking, and prototyping can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what one ultimately creates. Students will expand their arsenal of design research skills, learn how to think critically about their audience, content, form, and processes, as well as, understand the importance of utilizing more than one research and design strategy.
  • Creative Coding
    This course is an introductory programming class, appropriate for students with no prior programming experience. Traditionally, introductory programming teaches algorithmic problem-solving, where a sequence of instructions describe the steps necessary to achieve a desired result. In this course, students are trained to go beyond this sequential thinking – to think concurrently and modularly.

ELECTIVES

  • Accessibility & Assistive Technology in Historical Sites and Museums — Amy Hurst & Anita Perr
    This multidisciplinary course allows students from a variety of backgrounds to work together to learn about and develop assistive technology for historical sites and museums. Students will work in teams to develop prototypes for individuals with diverse motor, cognitive, sensory, and behavior-emotional abilities.
  • Visual Design for Print, Temporal, and Interactive Media – Ahmed Ansari
    This class focuses on the foundations of visual communication that are relevant to a variety of disciplines, such as communication design, media design, and interface design. Apart from static, 2-dimensional planar design for print, students will also be exposed to principles in designing for temporal media like film and television, and for the web and interactive media. Practical software skills working in Adobe Creative Suite, with a focus on Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and After Effects, will be covered. Students will also be given significant exposure to the history, theory, and discourses of Western graphic design and typography over the 20th and 21st centuries – we will also briefly cover traditions outside of the Anglo-European in an appraisal of Near-Eastern, South-Asian, and East-Asian typography and graphic design.
  • Social Virtual Reality– Carla Gannis
    Social VR involves web-based person to person or community interaction in immersive simulated worlds. Individuals appear as avatars and engage in real-time conversation and activities. This course is designed to engage students critically in exploring and prototyping social VR applications; applications that take into consideration accessibility, inclusion and presence, and the possibilities and limitations of current open source platforms.
  • Virtual Production Development– Todd Bryant
    This class will discuss the key issues, challenges, and best practices in visual storytelling in Cinema and emerging media like real-time spatial computing. The class will teach how to architect and lead a virtual production by creating a dialogue between the Producer, Director, and Cinematographer in filmmaking with the Technical Producer and Director in creative technology. The class will cover an overview of all of the technical skills required to produce a remote virtual production through the lens of a project manager making administrative and creative decisions. This class will culminate in a real-time 3D project exploring motion capture and virtual production that will create a narrative cinematic work with the class themes in mind.
  • Wearables– Kathleen McDermott
    “Wearable” is a term used in fields such as research, fashion, consumer tech, HCI, gaming, healthcare, performance arts, visual art, and design. Despite this broad spectrum of applications, “wearable” design across disciplines shares a common challenge: designing for the human body. In this class, we will explore the unique design conditions of creating wearable technology for human and non-human bodies, conditions which include the fact that bodies are flexible, mobile, dynamic, and diverse. We will utilize physical computing, flexible conductive materials, and techniques from fashion design, to create novel wearable prototypes. Simultaneously, we will complete readings and discussions to consider the ethical implications of designing technology for the body and how this field may evolve in the future.
  • Mixed Reality Filmmaking– Matthew Rader
    This course provides an introduction to compositing video using traditional vfx and realtime pipelines with the Unreal Engine. Students will develop cinematics that composite video into 3D virtual worlds. Using matchmotion tracking students will integrate the camera movement of footage shot on greenscreen into CGI environments. Students will develop their concepts using pre-viz and virtual production techniques.
  • Interfaces– Scott Fitzgerald
    Interfaces are the means through which we come to know, interact, and communicate with not only computing devices, but people, objects, and the world around us. They guide and move us in specific ways, revealing some characteristics while concealing others. In this course, students will research, critique, and build hardware and software interfaces for applications, services, and experiences. Prototypes will be made from found materials, in code, and with electronics. These objects will be novel, ludic, and enacted with an understanding that material practice is a form of research.
  • Images in the Expanded Field– Kevin Siwoff
    How do images operate in the world? Do they contain memories or tell myths? Can they reproduce and generate new images? Or are they often repeated with variation throughout consciousness? This course is not a dystopian science fiction about object sentience—it’s a hands-on exploration of contemporary themes within moving image practice. Through short readings, film screenings, group discussions, and self-directed design propositions, we will explore these questions, revealing their power and potential socio-ethico-political implications. The example works we will study throughout the semester will present an array of concepts key to understanding image-centered technoculture such as the subjectivity of the camera, perspective and bias, operative imagery, human-machine labor, computer vision, mediated memory, the posthuman and postcolonial eye, and artificial intelligence.
  • Mobile Augmented Reality Studio – Mark Skwarek
    This course examines the potential of mobile augmented reality [AR] and its future impact on society. Students will explore these emerging possibilities through hands on learning with the latest software and hardware. Students will gain a strong understanding of the AR industry’s past, present, and especially its future trends. It is recommended that students have experience with Photoshop and Maya or 3D Max software
  • Looking Forward – Regine Gilbert and Gus Chalkias
    This course surveys assistive technologies for people with low vision and blindness, from historical, contemporary, and forward thinking perspectives. Guest lectures from leaders in the field and people with lived experience will help students learn about low-vision and blindness accessibility across several domains (web, wayfinding, literacy, socialization, etc.). In the second half of the class, students will partner with each other and clients/community members to develop their own projects that transform and advance these technologies.
  • Technology, Media, and Democracy – Justin Hendricks
    This course represents a New York City-wide effort to create new tech that supports and defends journalism and media — the most critical elements of our democracy — as they are increasingly threatened by political and market forces. The course brings together journalism, design, media studies, and technical disciplines to understand the various threats to journalism and media, and attempt to address these challenges using technical and computational methods and techniques. The free press, journalism and the media are some of the most critical elements of our democracy, but have been increasingly under attack by political and market forces. These challenges include: dwindling resources and support for deep investigative journalism; smear, law and technical and even physical assaults of media organizations and journalists; challenges to credibility and reliability including fake news and discrediting campaigns; and shifting business models and income sources that threaten both local and national news organizations and coverage.
  • Programming is the Art of the Possible – Sam Tarkajian
    What does it mean to be compatible? A given piece of software might not be compatible with a particular operating system. However, with enough effort, almost any system can be made to work with any other. Businesses, institutions, people, and even works of art increasingly offer themselves for automated consumption. People describe themselves by filling out forms on social media profiles. Domino’s Pizza can be ordered using a command line API. Art and an audience may meet in person, or their encounter might be mediated by a screen, or they may never meet at all, instead simply exchanging packets of information. Adobe Illustrator is a drawing application with a scripting language. By taking advantage of this language, we can challenge the stated purpose of the software and invent new uses. GarageBand could send MIDI notes through an interpretation layer to Illustrator, turning musical events into graphic gestures. In this class, we’ll examine tools and techniques for coordinating interaction between and among disparate pieces of hardware and software. We’ll learn different protocols for communication, like HTTP and OSC. We’ll see how to deploy web services, and how to use those services to power networked art. Throughout the course, we’ll put a strong emphasis on group work, and on social strategies for building complex systems as a small team.
  • User Experience Design (ONLINE) – Regine Gilbert
    This is a course on user experience design following the user – centered design process. The course is oriented toward practical methods for approaching a design problem holistically, beyond usability and usefulness. In this class, you will develop an appreciation for the notion of user experience including how to design for it and how to evaluate it. The course will focus on storytelling, sketching, and communication of design ideas within a design team and to potential users. Assignments will focus on hands-on learning through individual assignments, application of design skills in group mini-projects, and peer critique. Creative professionals will be invited as class critics and guest speakers. This course will prepare you to present in a variety of professional environments.